Salem Architecture, Historic Homes & Landmarks

 The House of the Seven Gables 

The House of the Seven Gables, Salem, Massachusetts. View of front and side.

The House of the Seven Gables (1668) is a Colonial  mansion in Salem, Massachusetts,  as well as a novel written in 1851 by American author Nathaniel Hawthorne. The house is now a nonprofit museum open for tours; an admission fee is charged.

The House is also known as the Turner House or Turner-Ingersoll Mansion. Its earliest section was built in 1668 for Capt. John Turner. It remained in his family for three generations, being subsequently owned by John Turner II and John Turner III. Facing south towards the Salem harbor, it was originally a two-room, two-and-a-half story house with cross-gables and a massive central chimney. This original portion now forms the middle of the house; four windows of the original ground-floor room (which became a dining room) may be seen in the house's side wall. A few years later, a kitchen lean-to was added. In 1680, Turner added a spacious south (front) extension with its own chimney, containing a parlor on the ground floor, with a large bed chamber above it. Ceilings in this new wing are higher than the very low ceilings in the older parts of the house. The new wing featured double casement windows and an overhang with carved pendants; it was capped with a three-gabled garret.

In 1692, John Turner II added a new north kitchen ell to the rear of the house (later removed but then restored in 1908-1910), as well as the famous "secret stairway" within the rebuilt main chimney. Circa 1725 he remodeled the house in the new Georgian style, adding wood panelling to the rooms and double sash windows. These alterations remain, and are very early examples of Georgian decor.

After John Turner III lost the family fortune, the house was acquired by the Ingersolls, relatives of Nathaniel Hawthorne. He was thus often entertained in the house while growing up, by his cousin Susan Ingersoll. During these later years, gables were removed, porches replaced, and Victorian trim added. In Hawthornes time, the house had only four or five gables, but his cousin told him the house's history, and showed him beams and mortises in the attic indicating the locations of former gables. (In those visits Horace Ingersoll also told Hawthorne a story of Acadian lovers that later became the basis of Longfellow's  famous poem "Evangeline".) In 1908, the house was purchased by Caroline O. Emmerton, founder of the House of Seven Gables Settlement Association, and she restored it from 1908-1910 as a museum whose admission fees would support the association. Boston architect Joseph Everett Chandler  supervised the restoration, which among other alterations added back the missing gables.

Many interesting features of the original mansion remain, including unusual forms of wall insulation, original beams and rafters, and extensive Georgian paneling.

The Nathaniel Hawthorne Birthplace is now immediately adjacent to the House of the Seven Gables, and also covered by the admission fee. Although it is indeed the house in which Hawthorne was born and lived to age 4, the house was sited elsewhere when he lived there.

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To learn more about the House of Seven Gables, visit the Offical Website at:

http://www.7gables.org/

 Nathaniel Hawthorne's Birthplace

Nathaniel Hawthorne Birthplace, Salem, Massachusetts.

The Nathaniel Hawthorne Birthplace is the birthplace of American author Nathaniel Hawthorne. It is located at 27 Hardy Street but accessible through 54 Turner Street, Salem, Massachusetts. The house is now a nonprofit museum along with The House of the Seven Gables immediately adjacent; an admission fee is charged.

The house was built sometime between 1730-1745, and located at 27 Union Street until moved to its current location in 1958. According to architectural historian Abbott Lowell Cummings,  the house was probably built for Joshua Pickman, and may have recycled structural timbers from a 17th century Pickman house that earlier stood on its site. It reflects typical architecture for the period: a central chimney, gambrel roof, front and back stairways, and a post-and-lintel doorway. The ground floor is laid out with kitchen to the right and main room to the left. The second floor has front and back rooms on each sideHawthorne's grandfather purchased the building in 1772. Hawthorne was born in the house on July 4, 1804, and lived in the house until age 4. Most of the interior has been preserved intact. 

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 Nathaniel Bowditch House

The Nathaniel Bowditch House (circa 1805), sometimes called by Bowditch-Osgood House, is a historic house located at 9 North Street, Salem, Massachusetts.  It was once the home of Nathaniel Bowditch, the founder of modern navigation, and is now a National Historic Landmark and listed in the National Register of Historic Places.  It currently serves as the home of Historic Salem, Inc.

The Bowditch House is significant both architecturally and historically. It is a three-story, low-hipped, clapboarded house in the Federal style, with a recessed front doorway (added circa 1825) and a recently restored roof balustrade, originally built for the Corwin family, famous for their part in the Salem Witch Trials. It was owned by Bowditch from 1811 to 1823. Subsequent owners included the Massachusetts General Hospital  and Joseph B. F. Osgood, a Salem lawyer, judge, and mayor.

The house was originally located at 312 Essex Street, but in 1944 was moved to its current site and restored (along with the adjacent Corwin "Witch House") when street widening threatened the house.

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To see photo's of the Bodwich House and to  learn more about  it's restoration and preservation, visit :

The Bodwich Inititive Website at

http://www.nathanielbowditch.org/house/index.html

 The Pickering House 
The Pickering House, 18 Broad Street, Salem, Massachusetts.
The Pickering House (circa 1651) is a remarkable Colonial  house, owned and occupied by ten successive generations of the Pickering family including Colonel Timothy Pickering. This house is believed to be the oldest house in the United States continuously occupied by one family. It is located at 18 Broad Street, Salem, Massachusetts and is open to the public under the auspices of the nonprofit Pickering Foundation.

Although the core house is first period, it has evolved considerably over the years. Architectural historian Abbott Lowell Cummings , in his Architecture in Colonial Massachusetts, concludes that the right-hand side of today's house was built for John Pickering, Sr., a carpenter, before his death in 1657 upon land granted to him in 1637. This original house was two stories tall, with a single room on each floor, and an entry bay. The left side was then added circa 1671 by his son, John Pickering II. In 1751, Deacon Timothy Pickering raised a rear lean-to up to a full two stories, which is how the house exists today.

In 1841 the front facade was reworked in the Gothic style,  with the facade gables probably dating from this time. Many of the house's external features date from this alteration, including the roof finials, round windows in the gables, cornice brackets, and exterior entry porch. Family records also suggest that a passageway was cut through the chimney stack at this time, and that the exterior chimney was remodeled to today's columnar style at this time. The fine Gothic-style fence with its cut-outs and obelisk finials was also added in this renovation. In 1904 a two-story ell was added to the rear. In 1948, Boston architect Gordon Robb carried out interior restoration work.

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To learn more about Col. Timothy Pickering, visit this site at : http://www.qmfound.com/COL_Timothy_Pickering.htm

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 The Crowninshield-Bentley House

The Crowninshield-Bentley House, Salem, Massachusetts.

The Crowninshield-Bentley House (circa 1727-1730) is a Colonial  house in the Georgian style, located at 126 Essex Street, Salem, Massachussets.. It is now owned by the Peabody Essex Museum and open for public tours from June to October.

The house was originally built for sea captain John Crowninshield at a site on 106 Essex Street. It is a symmetrical five-bay structure, clapboarded, two stories tall, with three small dormers through the roof, and a central entry door. Some believe it may have started as a "half house" on the east side, and been expanded in 1761 and again in 1794. The building was moved to its present location in 1959-1960, at which time it was restored.

Four generations of Crowninshields lived in the house until 1832. Its main historical interest centers upon Reverend William Bentley  a boarder from 1791 to 1819.

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 John Tucker Daland House 

The John Tucker Daland House, Salem, Massachusetts.

The John Tucker Daland House (1851-1852) is an imposing, Italianate house designed by architect Gridley James Fox Bryant. It is located at 132 Essex Street, Salem, Massachusetts, and now owned by the Peabody Essex Museum as home for the Essex Institute. It is open to the public six days a week.

The three-story brick house was originally built for John Tucker Daland, a prosperous merchant. The Dalands lived in the house until 1885, when it was acquired by the Essex Institute. It was then remodeled as offices by architect William Devereux Dennis (1847-1913) and in 1907 connected to the adjacent Plummer Hall (former home to the Salem Athenaeum.)

The house was among the last detached brick houses to be built in Salem. Features of interest include rusticated corner quoins and foundation, fine cornices, both arched and flat-entablatured windows, and an imposing front porch supported by Corinthian columns and topped with a Palladian window. At one time the house also featured roof and porch balustrades, as well as panelled brick chimneys.

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 The Gedney House 

Gedney House, exterior view.

The Gedney House is a historic Colonial American  house, estimated to have been constructed circa 1665. It is located at 21 High Street, Salem, Massachusetts  and operated as a non-profit museum by Historic New England. The house is rarely open to the public, though private tours can be arranged.

The house was built for Eleazor Gedney, a well-to-do shipwright married to the sister of John Turner, builder of Salem's House of Seven Gables. Gedney purchased the unimproved land here in April of 1664 close to the shore and the "buildplace" for his boats. He was married in June of 1665, and the original portion of the house, two stories with gabled attic to the left and a parlor with lean-to roof to the right was erected at this time. Long-gone extensions at the rear (where some structural evidence survives) were probably original. They were surely in existence at the time of Eleazer's early death in 1683 when an estate inventory mentions the hall, hall chamber, a garret, "parlour or lento" and "lento chambr," and "Kitchin, Loft over it & little leantoo." The latter lean-to was presumably in the rear.

Around 1703-06, the original parlor lean-to was raised to a full two stories. The last (and most extensive) structural changes followed about 1800, whereby a new two-story lean-to at the rear with separate chimney replaced whatever had preceded it. At this time also the framed overhang along the street was furred out and a basement kitchen introduced. Around 1962 the central chimney was removed and the interior stripped. The house was acquired by Historic New England in 1967.

The house is significant for its structural carpentry and for surviving early paint and decorative finishes. In the hall chamber three successive color schemes can be identified, the earliest thought to be contemporary or near-contemporary with original construction.

In 2002 the Oxford Dendrochronology  Laboratory analyzed timber from the original structure and ascertained that donor trees were felled at the following times: Spring 1664 and Winter 1664/5.

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 The Ropes Mansion

The Ropes Mansion, with First Church Unitarian in the background, Salem, Massachusetts.

The Ropes Mansion (late 1720s), also called Ropes Memorial, is a Georgian Colonial mansion located at 318 Essex Street, Salem, Massachusetts. It is now operated by the Peabody Essex Museum and open to the public.

The house was built for Samuel Barnard, a merchant. In 1768, Judge Nathaniel Ropes, Jr., purchased the house from Barnard's nephew. The Ropes family then inhabited the house until 1907, when the house was given to the Trustees of the Ropes Memorial for public benefit.

Although altered through the years and then restored, the house looks much like its original form, with a symmetrical facade of two stories, three small pedimented gables through the roof, roof balustrade, and modillioned cornice. (Compare it to the Crowninshield-Bentley House.) In 1807, however, its interior was extensively renovated. In the mid 1830s five rooms and the central hall were remodelled, and today's doorway installed (with details inspired by Asher Benjamin s pattern book. In 1894 the house was moved away from the street and further modified internally. A large, fine garden was added behind the house in 1912.

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Credit for the following articles ( text and photo's) goes to a wikipedia user named " Daderot". He gives no other information on who he may be but I would like to say

THANK YOU for the beatufiul Salem photo's he took.

so Daderot, if you are out there.... Please contact me.

Links to other Salem Architecture sites, Historic Homes and Landmarks



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Copyright Š 2005 by Terryl Whitaker Pilon