Salem Narratives

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HENRY BARTHOLOMEW

Henry Bartholomew came from London, England, when he was 29 years old. He arrived in New England, on November 7, 1635, and he settled in Salem. Henry was a Representative (in 1635) and for eighteen years afterwards. William Bartholomew settled in Ipswich after coming to Massachusetts on the Griffin. Henry was a merchant who lived in Salem, except for 1679-1681, when he lived in Boston, Massachusetts. Henry was born about 1607 and died on November 22, 1692. Henry was married to Elizabeth Scudder. Elizabeth was the daughter of Thomas Scudder and Elizabeth Lowers. The Scudder family was another prominent Salem family. Thomas Scudder was from Horton Kirby, Kent County, England. He came to New England in 1638, and he was a proprietor in Salem. Children of Henry and Elizabeth were: Elizabeth Bartholomew was baptized May 8, 1641, and died young. Hannah Bartholomew was bapitized on February 12, 1642/3 and married (A) James Brown (B) Dr John Swinerton. John Bartholomew was baptized on November 10, 1644. Eleazor Bartholomew was baptized July 29, 1649. Abraham Bartholomew was baptized October 6, 1650. Abigail Bartholomew was baptized on October 6, 1650, and married Nehemiah Willoughby. William Bartholomew was baptized October 2, 1652. Elizabeth Bartholomew was baptized July 2, 1652 and married John Pilgrim. Henry Bartholomew, Jr. was baptized on May 10, 1657 (a merchant) and member of the First Church in Boston, and he married Katherine ? They had no children, but adopted a daughter, Katherine, who married a ? Walker before 1694. Sarah Bartholomew was born on November 29, 1658 in Salem, Essex County, Massachusetts and christened on December 6, 1658. Henry Bartholomew's Land Purchases: Henry Bartholomew was granted 50 acres of land, in Salem, on December 26, 1638. On October 9, 1639, Henry was granted 100 acres. On June 10, 1642, he was granted another 100 acres plus 10 acres of meadow in Salem surrounded by a lake of 10-12 acres. Henry's lake was called "Bartholomew Pond." Bartholomew Pond was surrounded by "Bartholomew Rocks" and "Bartholomew Woods." Henry's land was located about four (4) miles outside of the city of Salem. On May 14, 1645, Henry Bartholomew was seated in the General Court with Captain William Hathorne, as Deputy. Captain Hathorne was the ancestor of Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864) the author of Twice Told Tales (1831), The Scarlett Letter (1850), and The House of Seven Gables (1851/1852). Richard Bartholomew was an unmarried merchant. Richard's brothers: Henry Bartholomew, William Bartholomew, Thomas Bartholomew, Abraham Bartholomew, and his sister Sarah Bartholomew, all lived in Salem. Richard died on a trip back to London, England in the spring of 1646. Henry Bartholomew and seven others were commissioners of the eight towns within the county. They met in Salem on March 31, 1652, and elected Major Dan Denison and Captain William Hathorne for the office of magistrates for the county courts of Essex. Salem became an important fishing center. In 1641, 300,000 codfish were caught and shipped back to England. Massachusetts also became a shipbuilding center.

Submitted byMargaret Odrowaz-Sypniewska B.F.A., © 2000 AuchterMay1@aol.com
Used By Permission of the Author


BENJAMIN COOPER (Unk.-1644)

Benjamin Cooper, uncle of Philemon Dickerson was a freeman in 1641. Benjamin Cooper lived in Salem, and died there in 1644. Benjamin's son(?) was a shoemaker, in Salem, and died in 1660. Benjamin came on the Mary Anne of Yarmouth, England. The Mary Anne was commanded by William Goose of Salem, Massachusetts. William married the sister of William Towne, father of three accused Salem "witches." Cooper came with his nephew Philemon Dickerson. Philemon was the indentured servant of Benjamin. From the Mary Anne ship's passenger's log: Benjamin Cooper 50 husbandsman of Brampton, Suffolk. Going to Salem. Mrs. Elizabeth Cooper 48 Lawrence Cooper Mary Copper Rebecca Cooper Benjamin Cooper, Jr. Frances Fillingham (Benjamin's son-in-law) Ester Cooper (Benjamin's sister) John Killin Philemon Dickerson, servant going to Salem, MA. Philemon Dickerson would later marry Mary Paine, the daughter of Thomas Paine. Phileomon came from the Parish of Dewsbury, West Riding, York County, England, and settled in Salem.

Submitted byMargaret Odrowaz-Sypniewska B.F.A., © 2000 AuchterMay1@aol.com
Used By Permission of the Author


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GOV. JOHN ENDECOTT(ENDICOTT)

John Endecott came from Dorchester (in one account) and arrived in Salem in September 1628. He was elected assistant in 1630. He was promoted to Colonel in 1636. In building the town, Governor John Endecott of Devonshire, England, and the Massachusetts Bay Company (established in 1629), began to enlarge the town of Salem. Governor Endecott was requested to take the advice of Thomas Graves of Gravesend, Kentshire, England; a man who was able to survey and lay the land. Each person was to be given land of equal proportions. Governor Endecott was ordered to allot lands to those who sent over servants or cattle in the several ships in 1629. If anyone was unhappy with their land, they were allowed to later exchange their land, after the first two hundred acres were distributed. A man could build his home on this land. Before Endecott, the town was led by Roger Conant. Endecott extended the colony's jurisdiction to include Merrymont (later Quincey, MA.) when he personally cut down Thomas Morton's Maypole, which was seen as a pagan symbol. Each person that came to this colony came over at his own expense and was an adventurer in common stock and had alloted to him 50 acres of land for each individual in his family. The Reverend Francis Higginson wrote a pamplet that read: "There is hardly a more healthful place to be found in the world that agreeth better with our English bodies" and "a sup of New England's air is better than a whole draft of Old England's ale." A few months after writing those words, Higginson died, but most newcomers survived. Endecott was ranked much like a governor and was succeeded by John Winthrop in October 1629, even though Winthrop did not arrive until 1630. Endecott then worked as Governor Winthrop's assistant and chief military advisor. He was deputy-governor in 1641, and governor in 1644, 1649, 1651, 1652, 1653, and from 1655 to 1664. He was major-general from 1645-1648. John died in Boston on March 15, 1665 (at age 76). In 1629 many Puritans came from Suffolk, Lincolnshire, and Yorkshire, England. Many were related to those who came on earlier ships to New England. Isaac Johnson was said to be the brother-in-law to the Earl of Lincoln, and his children would marry into the Bartholomew line. The Earl of Lincoln's sister, Arabella, even had a ship named after her. The Arabella reached Massachusetts Bay on June 10, 1630. John Endecott's first wife was (1)Anna Gover/Glover. Ann died shortly after 1628. He married (2)Elizabeth Gibson on August 18, 1630. John Endecott's son, John Endecott, Jr. was a freeman in 1665. John Jr. married Elizabeth Houchin, daughter of Jeremy Houchin of Boston, Massachusetts. John, Sr's other son was Zerubbabel Endecott. Zerubbabel lived in Salem and was a freeman in 1665, and died in 1684. His children were: John, Samuel, Zerubbabel, Jr., and five daughters. Zerubbabel married the widow of Rev. Antipas Newman. According to the Bible: Zerubbabel was born in Babel. He was the head of the tribe of Judah at the time when they returned from captivity in Babylon, in the first year of Cyrus. Zerubbabel was later known as "the prince," on the issuing of the "Cyrus Decree," was eventually the ruler of Jerusalem. It is interesting the Salem came from the name Jerusalem, and that one of its prominent citizens named their son Zerubbabel. Zerubbabel was in the service of the King of Babylon and thus received the Chaldee name, Sheshbazzar. He then was made governor of Judea by appointment of the Persian king. All this is too ironic! John Endecott's family was similar to the family of Zerubbabel. Arriving in Jerusalem [Salem}, Zerubbabel began to rebuild a temple. However, he was more seriously engaged in building his own costly house which took Zerubbabal sixteen years. After his home was completed, Zerubbabel took his temple work more seriously. It seems that Zerubbabel Endecott's name went to his head, because he began to accuse Mary [nee Perkins] Bradbury of many trumped up crimes. One being that her swine attacked him and his brothers one day while riding their horses. The pig was never eaten in Jewish law because it was considered an "unclean" mammal. Why? because it had coven hoofs. Animals with coven hoofs were thought to be associated with the devil. As early as 6,000 B.C., the boar was one of the gods of the underworld in my pagan cults. This alone might have set a seed into their minds? However, in Scotland, the boar is the symbol of St. Andrew, and many coats of arms have the boar as their symbol. The Endecott's were related to the "Witch Bitches" or accusers of the majority of the tried and hanged "Witches."

Submitted byMargaret Odrowaz-Sypniewska B.F.A., © 2000 AuchterMay1@aol.com
Used By Permission of the Author



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PHILLIP ENGLISH (Phillippe L'Anglois)

Phillippe L'Anglois was a French Huguenot from the Isle of Jersey. Little is known of his early life before Salem. The French called the port of St. Malo "La Cite Corsaire," but the English called it a "nest of wasps." St. Malo was a walled town rich with the profits of privateering in the 17th century. St Malo's economy was based on trade and fishing. Shallow reefs lined the bay leading to the island of granite on the Emerald coast of Brittany. The ancient citadel, the Cathedral of St. Vincent is easily seen from the sea. St. Vincent was founded by Welsh monks in the 12th century. Most French corsairs emerged as early as the 9th century. This was when they were fighting against the Vikings. Most French corsairs were descendants of fathers, uncles, and grandfather's that were also corsairs. The subject of this study is Phillippe L'Anglois Phillippe changed his name to Philip English. By 1660, he was the master of his own ship. He came to Salem sometime in the 1670s, as a merchant. The English/L'Anglois Family owned 21 vessels, a wharf, and 14 buildings in Salem by 1692. They had a three-story mansion on Essex Street with pojected porches. To say the family was prospering would be an understatement. On March 1692, Philip was appointed Salem's selectman. On April 1692, fate intervened and Philip's wife, Mary [nee Hollingsman] was accused of witchcraft and arrested. She was kept in a chamber of their public house for six (6) weeks while waiting for her trial. Then Philip was accused, and examined by the court, on May 31, 1692! He and his wife, Mary Hollingworth, managed to escape, with the help of their friends, and went to New York. Their friends were John Moody, Governor Phips, and Governor Fletcher. It is thought that the powerful people that surrounded Philip English most likely had interest in his privateering and trade, and that was the reason he was not hanged as a witch. William Hollingsworth, Mary's father, had his own prominent shipping legacy and his family had holdings in Salem, Massachusetts. Mary French was a member of Salem's First Church and took communion beginning in 1681. They remained in New York until the end of the witchcraft hysteria, then returned home to their business. Philip died in 1736. Philip had been one of the citizens that spoke out against Rev. Noyes for murdering John Proctor and Rebecca Nurse. Philip English made numerous trips to the West Indies, to St Malo, then back to Boston harbor. St Malo was a pirate port in N.W. France. Philip made numerous trips to the West Indies and to St. Malo, then back to Boston harbor. He went to Spain, and French wine country, England, and back to Malo. The 300 ton ship Mary Ann was contructed in 1641 in the Port of Salem. While in 1642, Boston launched the 160 ton Trial. The majority of the ships built in the colonies were still English-owned, but captains held titles to approximately 420 vessels that ranged from 30-250 tons. Once they were commissioned to their own ships, they would be able to keep all the profits of their labors. It is thought that the powerful people that surrounded Philip English most likely had interest in his privateering and trade, and that was the reason he was not hanged as a witch.

Submitted by Margaret Odrowaz-SypniewskaMargaret Odrowaz-Sypniewski, B.F.A., © 2000 AuchterMay1@aol.com
Used By Permission of the Author


To Learn more about Philip English, visit this page: Phillip & Mary English

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JOHN HATHORNE

John Hathorne was born August 5, 1641 and died May 10, 1717. He was a merchant in Salem, Massachusetts.He was also one of the key magistrates in the Salem Witch Trials. He was the only individual to show no remorse or regret for his actions during the trials. John Hathorne was the great-great-grandfather of Nathaniel Hawthorne,the author, who changed his surname (adding the letter "W", Hathorne to Hawthorne).Many believe he was trying to avoid the association with the Hathorne name and the negative conotations of the Salem Witchcraft Trials and his ancestors involement. Magistrate John Hathorne is buried at the Charter Street Burying Ground ( Charter Street Cemetery)in Salem, Massachusetts.

Submitted by Terryl Whitaker Pilon

To learn more about John Hathorne's involment in the Salem Witchcraft Trials,
Visit the Salem Gen Web's page: The Salem Witchcraft Trials

To learn more about the Hathorne/Hawthorne family history and genealogy
Visit this site: Hawthorne In Salem

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NATHANIEL HAWTHORNE

Nathaniel Hawthorne (July 4, 1804 – May 19, 1864) was a 19th century American novelist and short story writer. He is seen as a key figure in the development of American literature. Nathaniel Hawthorne was a famous author who was born in Salem, Massachusetts, where his birthplace is now a house museum, and died in Plymouth, New Hampshire. Hawthorne's father was a sea captain and descendant of John Hathorne, one of the judges who oversaw the Salem Witch Trials. (Having learned about this, the author added the "w" to his surname in his early twenties.) Hawthorne's father died at sea in 1808 of yellow fever when Hawthorne was only four years old, and Nathaniel was raised secluded from the world by his mother. Hawthorne attended Bowdoin College in Maine from 1821–1824, befriending classmates Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and future president Franklin Pierce. Until the publication of his Twice-Told Tales in 1837, Hawthorne wrote in the comparative obscurity of what he called his "owl's nest" in the family home. As he looked back on this period of his life, he wrote: "I have not lived, but only dreamed about living" [letter to Longfellow, June 4, 1837]. And yet it was this period of brooding and writing that had formed, as Malcolm Cowley was to describe it,"the central fact in Hawthorne's career," his "term of apprenticeship" that would eventually result in the "richly meditated fiction." Hawthorne was hired in 1839 as a weigher and gauger at the Boston Custom House. He had become engaged in the previous year to the illustrator and transcendentalist Sophia Peabody. Seeking a possible home for himself and Sophia, he joined the transcendentalist utopian community at Brook Farm in 1841; later that year, however, he left when he became dissatisfied with the experiment. (His Brook Farm adventure would prove an inspiration for his novel, The Blithedale Romance.) He married Sophia in 1842; they moved to The Old Manse in Concord, Massachusetts, where they lived for three years. Hawthorne and his wife then moved to The Wayside, previously a home of the Alcotts. Their neighbors in Concord included Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau. Nathaniel Hawthorne illustrated in an 1870 publicationLike Hawthorne, Sophia was a reclusive person. She was, in fact, bedridden with headaches until her sister introduced her to Hawthorne, after which her headaches seem to have abated. The Hawthornes enjoyed a long marriage, and Sophia was greatly enamored of her husband's work. In one of her journals, she writes: "I am always so dazzled and bewildered with the richness, the depth, the... jewels of beauty in his productions that I am always looking forward to a second reading where I can ponder and muse and fully take in the miraculous wealth of thoughts" [Jan 14th 1851, Journal of Sophia Hawthorne. Berg Collection NY Public Library]. In 1846 Hawthorne was appointed surveyor (determining the quantity and value of imported goods) at the Salem Custom House. Like his earlier appointment to the custom house in Boston, this employment was vulnerable to the politics of the spoils system. When Hawthorne later wrote The Scarlet Letter, he included a long introductory essay depicting his time at the Salem Custom House. He lost this job due to the change of administration in Washington after the presidential election of 1848. In 1852 he wrote the campaign biography of his old friend, Franklin Pierce. With Pierce's election as president, Hawthorne was rewarded in 1853 with the position of United States consul in Liverpool. In 1857 he resigned from this post and did some traveling in France and Italy. He and his family returned to The Wayside in 1860. Failing health (which biographer Edward Miller speculates was stomach cancer) began to prevent him from completing new writings. Hawthorne died in his sleep on May 19, 1864 in Plymouth, N.H. while on a tour of the White Mountains with Pierce. Nathaniel and Sophia Hawthorne had three children: Una, Julian, and Rose. Una suffered from mental illness and died young. Julian moved out west, served a jail term for embezzlement, and wrote a book about his father. Rose married George Parsons Lathrop, converted to Roman Catholicism and took her vows as a Dominican nun. She founded a religious orderto care for victims of incurable cancer. Hawthorne is best-known today for his many short stories (he called them "tales") and his four major romances of 1850–60: The Scarlet Letter (1850), The House of the Seven Gables (1851), The Blithedale Romance (1852), and The Marble Faun (1860). (Another book-length romance, Fanshawe, was published anonymously in 1828.) Before publishing his first collection of tales in 1837, Hawthorne wrote scores of short stories and sketches, publishing them anonymously or pseudonymously in periodicals such as The New-England Magazine and The United States Democratic Review. (The editor of the Democratic Review, John L. O'Sullivan, was a close friend of Hawthorne's.) Only after collecting a number of his short stories into the two-volume Twice-Told Tales in 1837 did Hawthorne begin to attach his name to his works. Much of Hawthorne's work is set in colonial New England, and many of his short stories have been read as moral allegories influenced by his Puritan background. "Ethan Brand" (1850) tells the story of a lime-burner who sets off to find the Unpardonable Sin, and in doing so, commits it. One of Hawthorne's most famous tales, "The Birth-Mark" (1843), concerns a young doctor who removes a birthmark from his wife's face, an operation which kills her. Other well-known tales include "Rappaccini's Daughter" (1844), "My Kinsman, Major Molineux" (1832), "The Minister's Black Veil" (1836), "Ethan Brand" (1851) and "Young Goodman Brown" (1835). "The Maypole of Merrymount" recounts a most interesting encounter between the Puritans and the forces of anarchy and hedonism. Tanglewood Tales (1853) was a re-writing some of the most famous of the ancient Greek myths in a volume for children, and from which was named Tanglewood estate and music venue. Hawthorne enjoyed a brief but intense friendship with American novelist Herman Melville beginning on August 5, 1850, when the two authors met at a picnic hosted by a mutual friend. Melville had just read Hawthorne's short story collection Mosses from an Old Manse, which Melville later praised in a famous review, "Hawthorne and His Mosses." Melville's letters to Hawthorne provide insight into the composition of Moby-Dick, which Melville dedicated to Hawthorne, 'in appreciation for his genius.' Hawthorne's letters to Melville did not survive.


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Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts
Subject to disclaimersIt uses material from the Wikipedia
article http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nathaniel Hawthorne

Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc.

To view photo's and read about Nathanial Hawthorne's Birthplace and The House of Seven Gables vist the Salem Gen Web's
Historical Homes and Landmarks page.

To read Nathanial Hawthorne's "The House of Seven Gable's", go here:
The House of Seven Gable's Online

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GEORGE JACOBS

George Jacobs was born about 1612. He and his wife had George Jr., Ann and perhaps more children. He lived in Salem Village in the Northfields section of Salem near the Danvers-Beverly border. George, at the time he was hanged, was about 80 and walked with "two staffs." He was however, still able to speak his mind. At his trial he retorted to the magistrates, "You tax me for a wizard, you may as well tax me for a buzzard..." Most of those who were accused of witchcraft saved their lives by acknowledging their wrongdoing and accusing another of leading them to the Devil. This newly accused person would then be brought to trial. George, perhaps because of his age did not accuse another individual, but stated "Well! Hang me or burn me, I will stand in the truth of Christ". George was hanged on Gallows Hill on 19 August 1692. In 1992, George's remains were moved and those words were placed on his stone.

Submitted by Charlie King

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TIMOTHY PICKERING

Timothy Pickering (July 17, 1745 – January 29, 1829) was the third United States Secretary of State, serving in that office from 1795 to 1800 under Presidents George Washington and John Adams. Pickering was born in Salem, Massachusetts, and graduated from Harvard University in 1763. He opposed the patriot cause early in the American Revolutionary War, but in 1777 he accepted General George Washington's offer to be adjutant general of the American army, and was widely praised for his work in supplying the troops during the remainder of the conflict. After the first of two failed attempts to make money speculating in Pennsylvania frontier land, now-President Washington appointed Pickering commissioner to the Iroquois Indians, and Pickering represented the United States in the negotiation of the Treaty of Canandaigua with the Iroquois in 1794. Washington also brought Pickering into his cabinet, as Postmaster General in 1791. He remained in the cabinet for nine years, serving as postmaster general until 1795, Secretary of War for a brief time in 1795, then Secretary of State from 1795 to 1800. After a quarrel with President John Adams over Adams's plan to make peace with France, Pickering was dismissed from office in May 1800. In 1802 Pickering and a band of Federalists, agitated at the lack of support for Federalists, attempted to gain support for the secession of New England from the Jeffersonian United States. The irony of a Federalist moving against the national government was not lost among his dissenters. He was named to the United States Senate as a senator from Massachusetts in 1803 as a member of the Federalist Party. He lost his senate seat in 1811, and was elected to the United States House of Representatives in 1812, where he remained until 1816. His congressional career is best remembered for his leadership of the New England secession movement (see Essex Junto and the Hartford Convention). After Pickering was denied re-election in 1816, he retired to Salem, where he lived as a farmer until his death in 1829. His ancestral home, the circa 1651 Pickering House, is now sometimes open to the public.

To learn more about Timothy Pickering
Visit this site: Col. Timothy Pickering, Quartermaster General

View the Pickering House at Salem Gen Web's
Historical Homes and Landmarks page: Pickering House

Visit Pickering Wharf at: Pickering Wharf

GFDL

Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts
Subject to disclaimersIt uses material from the Wikipedia
article Timothy Pickering

Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc.

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JOHN PROCTOR (c1631-1692)

John Proctor, a character in Arthur Miller's play: 'The Crucible', was a real person who lived in the 1600s. He was born in Ipswich, Massachusetts, and when he was around the age of 30, in the year 1666, he bought a large farm called Groton in the town of Salem, Massachusetts. However, farming was not John Proctor's only occupation. He also operated a tavern about a mile south of the Salem Village boundary. This job allowed him to come into contact with many people on a regular basis. The Salem selectmen would only allow Proctor to serve people in his tavern who were not local residents. This made Proctor's tavern a central meeting place for strangers.

John Proctor was married to Elizabeth Bassett Proctor. They had two sons, Benjamin and William, and one daughter, Elizabeth. John Proctor's wife and daughter would often tend to the tavern while he spent his days working on the farm. The Proctors disliked the Reverend Parris, and were included in an "Anti-Parris Network" led by Israel Porter. When his father died, Proctor inherited a portion of an estate worth 1,200 pounds. He was fairly wealthy, but not fully accepted or respected by the townspeople of Salem. He was called"Goodman", which is a title not quite as respectable as "Mr". Proctor attended church in Salem and sat in the fourth row of seats. He was equally comfortable in Ipswich, Boston, and Salem. However, he seems to have had closer ties to Ipswich than to Salem, because citizens of Ipswich signed a petition asking for his release from jail after he was imprisoned in 1692.

John Proctor and his wife were jailed for witchcraft in 1692. Joseph Bayley was a witness who provided evidence against Proctor. Bayley claimed that Proctor caused painful blows to his chest as he was riding by the tavern. John and Elizabeth Proctor were hanged on August 19, 1692. In 1711, John Proctor's family received much more compensation money from the Massachusetts General Court than most families of accused witches.


Composed by Kate Burke-Wallace; Submitted by Fran Jones

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RICHARD RAYMOND (1602-1692)

Probably born in Essex, England about 1602, but the search for his parentage continues. He arrived in Massachusetts Bay about 1629, possibly with Pilgrim contingent led by the Rev. Francis Higginson which landed on 29 June 1629, but this is not yet proven. First actual date given for Richard is 6 Aug. 1629 when he is on the list of 30 founding members of First Church (Congregational) of Salem. He was about age 27. The name of his wife, Judith, appears in next list of members about 1634. The date or place of their marriage is unknown. Richard was admitted as a freeman of the colony on 14 May 1634. He served on the trial jury for the First Session of the quarterly court in Salem held 27 June 1636, and again in 1637 and 1642. He was a mariner, owner of at least one 30-ton ketch, "Hopewell", doing coastal trade along Sound and East River as far south as Manhattan Island. In 1636, town of Salem granted to Richard half an acre of land at Winter Island in Salem Harbor for fishing trade. He also acquired a lot extending between present Derby and Essex Streets, later known as the Francis Skerry Lot where he built a house. In June 1662 Richard and his wife and most of his family removed to the Norwalk, Connecticut area, where he bought a house and lot from Ralph Keeler. On 10 Dec. 1664, John, the first-born, m. Mary Betts, d/o Thomas Betts, and they took possession of the Raymond home and there founded the Norwalk branch of the family. On 10 Sept. 1664, Richard and Judith moved to Saybrook on Connecticut River. In 1672 they joined the Saybrook Church. Both Richard and Judith Raymond d. in 1692 at Saybrook where they had lived with their youngest son, Daniel. Richard left no will, but rather disposed of his real property by land transactions. John received property outside Saybrook and Daniel inherited all of Saybrook holdings. In turn Daniel had agreed to care for his parents in their old age. Richard and Judith Raymond had nine children, all born in Salem.

Submitted by Paul Raymond

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WILLIAM TOWNE (1600-1672)

William Towne (1600-1672) was the son of John Towne and Elizabeth? of Yarmouth, Norfolk County, England. He was baptized in the St. Nicholas Parish Church on March 18, 1568/9. William Towne married JOANNA BLESSING on March 25, 1620, in St. Nicholas Church. In 1640, they emigrated to New England. William Towne, a gardiner, was a freeman on April 18, 1637. Joanna was the daughter of John Blessing (b. 1549) of Somerlayton, Suffolk County, England, and Joanne Preiste (b. 1553) When Joanne [nee Blessing] Towne (b. 1594) came to the colonies her sister, Alice [nee Blessing] Firmage (b. 1577), and her brother-in-law, Robert Buffam, husband of her late sister, Margaret [nee Blessing] (b. 1580) (deceased) came too. Joanne Blessing was known as "Mother Goose." This was a misleading name, since it was her sister, Juliana [nee Blessing] (b. 1571) who married Thomas Goose. Juliana was the eldest daughter. William Blessing was their brother (b. 1575). THE CHILDREN OF WILLIAM TOWNE 1) Rebecca Towne was born on February 21, 1621, in Great Yarmouth, England. Rebecca married Frances Nurse, a tray maker, on August 24, 1644. Rebecca was hanged for witchcraft on June 19, 1692, [at age 61] in Salem, MA. 2) John Towne was born February 16, 1623 in Great Yarmouth, England. John married Phebe Lawson, and he died in 1672 [at age 49]. 3) Suzanna Towne was born October 20, 1625 in Great Yarmouth, England. Suzanna was named after her aunt. Suzanna died in 1672 [at age 47]. Suzanna was spared her sister's anquish and pain. She was not targeted as a witch. 4) Edmund Towne was born July 28, 1628, in Great Yarmouth. Edmund apprenticed to Henry Skerry of Great Yarmouth. He sailed on either the Rose of Great Yarmouth, or the Henry and Dorothy of Ipswich. Both ships were commanded by William Andrews and his son, William. Skerry and his family settled in Salem, MA. Edmund married Mary Browning in 1652 [at age 24]. Their children were: ..... Abigail Towne married Thomas Perley ..... Samuel Towne married Elizabeth Knight [her line goes to U.S. President Calvin Coolidge] .....Elizabeth Towne married (2) Elisha Perkins (1654-1791) of Topsfield in 1715. 5) Jacob Towne was born on March 11, 1632. Jacob married Catherine Symonds, daughter of Samuel Symonds (1693-1772) and Elizabeth Andrews, on June 26, 1657. He died November 22, 1704, in Topsfield, MA. [at age 72]. Their son: ..... John Towne married Mary Smith. .....Katherine Towne (1662-1714) married Elisha Perkins in 1680. 6) Mary Towne was born August 24, 1634. He married Isaac Estey. Mary was hanged on September 22, 1692, during the Salem witch trials [at age 58]. Their son was: ..... Isaac Estey, Jr. married Abigail Kimball. 7) Sarah Towne - born on September 3, 1639, in Salem, MA. He married (1) Edmund Bridges (2) Peter Cloyes. Sarah Cloyes was accused of witchcraft, in 1692 [at age 53], and put into prison, and later released. She pressed charges for her unlawful arrest and the killing of her sisters. She received three gold sovereigns for each of them. The movie, Three Sovereigns For Sister Sarah is about this event. Her daughter was: ..... Hepzibah Cloyce, married Ebenezer Harrington. 8) Joseph Towne - born on September 3, 1639, in Salem, MA. Joseph married Phebe Perkins in 1665. Their children were: ..... Joseph Towne, Jr. married Margaret Case. ..... Susanna Towne married John Cummings ..... Martha Towne married Isaac Larrabee.

Submitted by Margaret Odrowaz-Sypniewska
Margaret Odrowaz-Sypniewski, B.F.A., © 2000 AuchterMay1@aol.com
Used By Permission of the Author


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ROGER WILLIAMS (1604-1683)

By the early 1630s, the Salem minister, Roger Williams (1604-1683), told the Massachusetts authorities that they had not gone far enough in separating themselves from the Church of England and the king. To avoid arrest, Williams fled from Salem and founded Providence, Rhode Island, in 1636. Roger Williams died in 1683, and was buried in a poorly marked grave at his home in Providence. In the year 1739, some workman accidently broke into his coffin, exposing his bones. Then in 1860 [177 years after his burial], Stephen Randall, a descendant of Rodger's, ordered the body to be exhumed and transfered to a more suitable place with a new tombstone. The workmen found only a few rusted nails and scraps of rotten wood. What is unusual is that Roger's body is now on display in the Rhode Island Historical Society, in Providence. It seems that his gravesite was near an apple tree, and that the tree took the shape of John William's body. The branches grew into his coffin and around his entire body. The tree literally absorbed his body over the years, and became his new coffin (Lyon, 84).

Submitted byMargaret Odrowaz-Sypniewska
Margaret Odrowaz-Sypniewski, B.F.A., © 2000 AuchterMay1@aol.com
Used By Permission of the Author



To learn more about Roger Williams, and read a more legnthy biography which includes some genealogical information, try this link:
Roger Williams,Theologian


To read some of Roger Williams writings, go here:
A Plea For Religious Liberty


To visit the Rogers Williams Family Association for more information, try this:
The Roger Williams Family Association


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